Fotor0513174428
managersaf
ibro
af
home
news
artworkf
books
sportswriters
newspaper
sx
MR
GL
Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 12.00.44

Number 1

Number 2

Number 3

Number 4

Number 5

Number 6

Number 7

Number 8

Number 9

Number 10

Number 11

Number 12

Number 13

 

 

 

BareKnuckle
stats
yz

The Boxing Biographies Newsletter

Volume 4- No8   18th  April ,  2009

 

Name: Charles Ledoux
Career Record:
click
Alias: Little Apache
Nationality:
French
Birthplace: Nievre, FR
Hometown:

Born: 1892-10-27
Died:
1967-05-21
Age at Death: 74
Height:
5′ 0″
Reach: 65 inches

The Times

9th February 1914

BANTAM-WEIGHT BOXING CHAMPIONSHIP. LEDOUX AGAIN SUCCESSFUL.

 

Charles Ledoux (France) and Bill Beynon (South Wales) met at Cardiff on Saturday night in a 20-round contest for 1,000 and the Bantam-Weight Championship of Europe. Beynon's seconds decided that he had had enough in  the ninth round, Ledoux thus repeating his victory of six weeks ago.

It was hoped that the plucky little Welshman would avenge his previous defeat,  which was due, in the opinion of certain patriotic authorities, to an unlucky  blow that split his eyebrow and compelled his retirement in the seventh round.

 On that occasion, however, he was so obviously outpaced and out-pointed by the Frenchman, whose hitting was also more severe, that the contest, even if it had  proceeded, must have ended in his defeat. On Saturday night, when about 7,000  spectators from all parts of Wales—most of them had seen Wales beat Scotland  decisively in the afternoon —assembled in the American Rink, Ledoux's  all-round superiority was again manifest.

From the first he proved himself faster and more  resourceful both at out-fighting and in-fighting, and his punch was much more effective than his opponent's. At in-fighting Ledoux was easily  the better man ; at close quarters, when it is necessary for a boxer to feel his way, he does  the right thing instinctively, and his only  fault is an unfortunate predilection for that unfair use of the elbows which ought to be ; regarded as more than a minor  offence by referees, for an elbow-thrust is often as hurtful as a deliberate butt from the head (such as  that which led to Driscoll's disqualification in  his historic  fight with Welsh). In the third round of Saturday's contest Ledoux was warned for using his elbow.

Up to the end of the fifth round Beynon had made a fair fight of it, though he had manifestly been outpointed, but afterwards he had much  the worse of the exchanges and never looked  to have the smallest chance of winning. Ledoux  scored  heavily every time he got inside ; and at out-fighting he was as skilful as Carpentier in his judgment of distance and in timing his man. Again and again he landed without getting anything in return ; in the ninth round he put a succession of lefts and rights to Beynon's face, which was swollen almost beyond recognition, and the latter's seconds wisely refused to allow their stout-hearted principal to incur any more punishment.

 If they had permitted him to perform the functions of a human punching-bag any longer the referee would no doubt have stopped the contest, though the Welshman was still strong on his  legs and by no means at the end of his staying power. There can be no doubt whatever that Ledoux is the best  bantam-weight on this side of the Atlantic, and it is  not easy to name an American boxer who could beat him. He is an almost perfect combination of the rugged fighter  and the skilful boxer whose skill is devoid of the mere cleverness which is worse than useless in a serious contest  with a bustling, courageous opponent.

 

End